Health

Vaccines, a Lifesaving Miracle

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According to an Imperial College of London study, the COVID-19 vaccines saved almost 20 million lives around the world in the first year. I can’t comprehend the deaths of 20 million people. Each one of those 20 million have people who loved them and people they loved. They each had people who depended on them. They each had a purpose on earth that would have been cut short if it weren’t for the vaccines. We were so lucky to have those lifesaving vaccines.

While these new vaccines were developed in an unprecedented short period of time, we have had other vaccines that have been around for a long time that we seem to be taking for granted. Remember the days when vaccinations were for newborns and kids getting ready for school. Measles, diphtheria, smallpox, and polio have largely become diseases of the past because of vaccines but they were primarily for children. I want to focus on important vaccines that protect adults.

Pneumonia, the disease that in the past was a killer of the elderly, can be controlled and prevented by a vaccine. Shingles, a painful disease, can be controlled with a vaccine. Older adults are encouraged to get the tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis vaccine booster to renew their resistance to those maladies. Another killer of older people is the flu. The estimate for deaths caused by the flu for the 2017/2018 season was 61,000. Each year we can get a vaccine that greatly reduces the impact of the flu, yet less than 50% of us get that lifesaving shot. This goes against what happened during the pandemic.

94% of the adults between the ages of 65 and 74 were fully vaccinated against COVID-19 during the pandemic. What changed, why did 94% of us choose to get the COVID-19 shot but, historically, 50% of us chose not to get vaccinated against the flu? It doesn’t seem to make sense. It is true that we reduced our visits to the doctor as we sequestered ourselves and our mask wearing during the pandemic reduced the spread of the flu, but what is going to happen this fall? We’re mostly not wearing masks so we are more vulnerable. Will we come to our senses or will we return to that embarrassing condition where half of us don’t get vaccinated?

Here’s an idea, since it looks like we will get another booster approved in the next few weeks that will protect us against the COVID-19 variants, why don’t you just ask your healthcare provider to give you the flu shot also? And if you want to get real crazy, why don’t you review your vaccination history with your doctor and catch up on all your vaccinations? So, how do you know what vaccines you need . . . glad you asked.

Here is a link to a website that asks you questions and generates what vaccinations you need. I went through the process, and it has given me a great start on what vaccinations I need but it also brought up more questions. What vaccinations have I already had? I’ve changed my primary physician three times in the last three years, once when I moved and a second time when I found a doctor that better met my needs. Where are my immunization records? What about when I got my flu shot last year at a pharmacy? Did they pass my immunization record to my primary doctor? I don’t recall if they even asked the name of my doctor. This brings me to something else we need to do to keep us on track – keep our own record of all of our immunizations. I bet you have been like me and carried you COVID-19 immunization record with you over the last two years. Mine is kind of worn around the edges from being in my wallet. I even took a picture of my record in case I lost my wallet. We need to use this same dedication in keeping track of all of our immunizations. It may be the only place where a complete and accurate record of all your immunizations exists. Think back, when was the last time your doctor asked you to go over all your immunizations? As of five years ago some doctors’ computer systems didn’t have a place for tracking adult immunizations. It’s a valuable thing to have.

If you’re like me, you can’t remember all of your past vaccinations. Here is another web site with some hints on how to find past health records and also a place to download a form that you can use to track you immunizations. Whatever you do, begin now to track your shots. If you get poked, write it down. It will be so fun the next time you cut yourself or step on a nail and the doctor asks when you last had a tetanus shot and you can tell her/him the exact date.

It’s National Immunization Awareness month. Let’s build on the momentum of being the best COVID-19 immunized age group and become the best immunized age group for all of our recommended immunizations, along with having the best record of our immunization history. It’s a lifesaving goal.

Best, Thair

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